Konferenz 2016

Programm zur 4. Jahrestagung des Arbeitskreises für spätmittelalterliche Wirtschaftsgeschichte in Zusammenarbeit mit dem SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen

Tagungsort: Kopenhagen, Karen Blixens Vej 4, building 27.0.17 

Termin: 16.11.-18.11.2016

To register for the event, please contact: alhuang@hum.ku.dk

Thursday, 17 November 2016

12:00-13:45 Arrival, registration, coffee & lunch
13:45-14:00 Introduction

14:00-14:45 Keynote lecture by Steven Marks (Clemson University): The Information Nexus

Session I: Discussant: Bjørn Poulsen (Aarhus University)
14:45-15:30 Angela Huang (University of Copenhagen): Inter-city communication on product quality among Hanse towns

15:30-16:00 Coffee Break

16:00-17:30 Anna Orlowska (Polish Academy of Sciences): The Cost of Information – Strategies of Merchants in Oxen Trade in Annual Fairs of the 15th and 16th Century
Ulla Kypta (University of Basel): Merchants’ representatives as inter-city information brokers
17:30-18:00 General Discussion

19:30 Conference Dinner

Friday, 18 November 2016

Session II: Discussant: Tanja Skambraks (Mannheim University)

10:00-11:30 Ole Meiners (University of Münster): Priceless Information. The informal exchange of services and the establishment of trust in 15th and 16th century Hanseatic trade networks
Aske Laursen Brock (The School of History, Rutherford): Knowledge accumulation and social networks in early modern England

11:30-13:00 Lunch

13:00-14:30 Maria Alexandrova (Moscow State University): Information, exchange rate, and interest rate in Thomas Gresham’s practice
Stefan Geißler (ETH Zurich): The Lloyd´s Lists – A Global Intelligence Unit?

14:30-15:00 Coffee Break

15:00-15:30 Final Discussion

To register for the event, please contact: alhuang@hum.ku.dk

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP

Between the 10th and the 16th century, economic exchange all over Europe increased remarkably, with ever-changing distribution patterns for goods and ideas. The dynamics and mutability of the economic and social system find a particular expression in the development of urban communities and markets. A number of agents with diverse interest and different degrees of specialization were engaged in or concerned with market activities. Nobility and urban authorities negotiated and established the framework for economic exchange; merchants, craftsmen, entrepreneurs, brokers, hosts and other groups and their associations shaped market design with every single transaction they carried out or decided against. Information is crucial for successful market participation of individuals, groups and organizations. The level and quality of information available to economic agents defines to a great part their relationship. Though information minimizes mistrust and thus coordination problems, it is not for free. The costs of information may not be forgotten when considering preferences of the many different individuals and groups we encounter at the market. Their behaviour is largely driven by their considerations about the value information has for them. What one may call the structures, mechanisms or arrangements underlying the acquisition and exchange of information thus deserve a particular attention when we study the functioning of markets. This field of study is closely associated with historical institutional studies that have contributed greatly to our understanding of economic development and activity, e.g. by introducing the interplay of informal and formal institutions or mechanisms and the societal context of markets into economic history. Departing from these considerations, the workshop brings together papers on the use and handling of information, particularly on northern European marketplaces between the 12th and 18th century. The workshop is part of the research project ‘Coping with Commercialization: Institutionalization in Medieval Commodity Trade and the Economic Integration of Northern Europe’ carried out by Angela Ling Huang (SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen) and financed by The Danish Council for Independent Research. The event is organized in collaboration with the ‚Arbeitskreis Spätmittelalterliche Wirtschaftsgeschichte‘. http://saxoinstitute.ku.dk/research/postdoc_projects/commercialization/ http://www.wirtschaftsgeschichte.org/

To register for the event, please contact: alhuang@hum.ku.dk

The Costs of Information in the Pre-modern Economy

Between the 10th and the 16th century, economic exchange all over Europe increased remarkably, with changing distribution patterns for goods and ideas. The dynamics and mutability of the economic and social system find a particular expression in the development of urban communities and markets. A number of agents with diverse interest and different degrees of specialization were engaged in or concerned with market activities. Nobility and urban authorities negotiated and established the framework for economic exchange; merchants, craftsmen, entrepreneurs, brokers, hosts and other groups and their associations shaped market design with every single transaction they carried out or decided against.

Information is crucial for successful market participation of individuals, groups and organizations. The level and quality of information available to economic agents defines to a great part their relationship. Though information minimizes mistrust and thus coordination problems, it is not for free. The costs of information may not be forgotten when considering preferences of the individuals and groups we encounter at the marketplace. Their behaviour is largely driven by their considerations about the value information has for them.

What one may call the structures, mechanisms or arrangements underlying the acquisition and exchange of information thus deserve a particular attention when we study the functioning of markets. This field of study is closely associated with historical institutional studies that have contributed greatly to our understanding of economic development and activity, e.g. by introducing the interplay of informal and formal institutions or mechanisms and the societal context of markets into economic history.

Departing from these considerations, the workshop wants to bring together papers on the use and handling of information particularly on northern European marketplaces between the 12th and 16th century. Although papers on today’s Netherlands, Germany, and the Baltic regions are preferred, interested participants whose research goes beyond this geographical or chronological scope are also invited to submit an abstract for consideration. Besides empirical studies, reflections on the methods available and appropriate for the study of the costs of and institutions for information exchange are also welcome. Last but not least, papers are most welcome that address similarities and differences between different types of exchange, markets or regions.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 400 words and a short CV until 30 June 2016 to alhuang@hum.ku.dk. The participants will be expected to give twenty-minute papers in English and submit working papers for internal pre-circulation at least two weeks before the workshop. To reach a broader audience, remote participation will be offered (listening only). The University of Copenhagen will cover travel and accommodation costs up to a reasonable level.

The workshop is part of the research project ‘Coping with Commercialization: Institutionalization in Medieval Commodity Trade and the Economic Integration of Northern Europe’ carried out by Angela Ling Huang (SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen, http://saxoinstitute.ku.dk/research/postdoc_projects/commercialization/) and financed by The Danish Council for Independent Research. The event is organized in collaboration with the ‚Arbeitskreis Spätmittelalterliche Wirtschaftsgeschichte‘ (http://www.wirtschaftsgeschichte.org/).

CfP_Costs of Information

Kontakt
Angela Huang
Saxo Institute, University of Copenhagen
alhuang@hum.ku.dk